Django Unimportant

django

By now you’ve seen Django Unchained. It’s a movie and as such is meant to be entertaining; a means of distracting you from the reality of your day-to-day life. Mission accomplished.

However, when it comes to the big picture, it’s an unimportant footnote. It’s astounding to see Black people constantly revisiting old circular arguments and repeating the same observations about Hollywood representations. In this case: how no Black person could’ve made the movie (untrue), how the movie is disrespectful towards ancestors (give us your version Spike), how White people were laughing inappropriately (Black people too), how the depiction is inaccurate (it’s not a documentary)…the list goes on.  But does any of it truly matter?

Obsequious validation seeking from Hollywood, blaming “The White man” or any other boogeyman to whom you attribute all your personal and social ills is not getting you what you want. Right now you’re stuck in a behavioral loop because you’re getting something from it. Somehow you’re still at the stage where you believe that even negative attention is good, complaining is productive and if you rage long enough, you’ll get your way. [By the way, that’s not “The White man”, that’s your infantile ego.] So you remain immersed in negative thoughts (energy), never changing the things you rail against or yourself because you’re thoroughly conditioned by forces (media) designed to keep you asleep. It’s not too far a stretch to say that right now, YOU ARE a SLAVE to that which you have given over your power (including your mindset).

Listen, I am merely doing the friend thing here and drawing attention to the behaviors that keep you in the same angry, frustrated, bitter 2012 state of mind. I want better for you in 2013 but that’s not enough; you have to want better for yourself. Consider carefully what truly matters, what it will take to get what you want and act accordingly.

“Emancipate yourself from mental slavery” ~Bob Marley

One Response to “Django Unimportant”

  • Django, was entertaining and unrealistic. Violent and validating. Satirical and Sad. Awesome and offensive. Quentin wanted to stir emotion in the hearts and minds of his viewers and he succeeded. I cheered and jeered through the whole movie while fully acknowledging that had Django been a real slave in the 1800’s he would have been dead and buried before the theme music had finished playing. “Homey (or slave masters in this case) don’t play that.”

    All in all, I liked the idea of the slave winning the day, the battle and the war. We know how things really went down but movies are about suspending disbelief. If the goal was to entertain, Tarantino, mission accomplished.

    the Super Sistah

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